Searched for : smartphone

unitedIf you're like me and spend 50% or more of your life reading the Sky Mall and United Airlines magazines in the seat back pocket in front of you, and if you also happen to have a Blackberry with a web browser enabled, or some other SmartPhone-ish thing that lets you browse the web, be sure to check out United 2 Go:

http://www.ua2go.com

Among the things you can do or check on this mobile-enabled site:

  • My itineraries: View your United Airlines and United Express segments regardless of where they were booked.
  • Flight availability: View domestic and international flight availability up to 331 days in the future on United flights. For Palm OS device's without a wireless connection, the downloadable electronic timetable is available monthly on united.com.
  • Flight status: This gives you up to the minute flight status that includes departure/arrival times, gate numbers and departure/arrival status for United flights.
  • Flight paging: Much like the Flight status alerts feature on united.com this allows you to request flight paging for future United flights
  • Mileage Plus summary: This function provides you with access to a summary of your Mileage Plus account.
  • Red Carpet Club locations: View Red Carpet Club information including location, hours and phone numbers.
  • Airport codes: An easy to use airport code lookup tool is at your fingertips for reference.  

If you're a frequent traveler on United, it's worth a bookmark.



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Mobile | Random Stuff
Saturday, 27 May 2006 04:40:20 (Pacific Daylight Time, UTC-07:00)
#  

The DualCor cPC running Windows XP Tablet PC EditionJames Kendrick's got some exclusive details on the DualCor cPC, a nifty looking mobile device that can run Windows XP for normal computing tasks, and switch to Windows Mobile 5.0 when the user needs more PDA type functions:

"The cPC sports a dual processor design, a Via 1.5 GHz processor running Windows for standard computing functions and an Intel chipset running Windows Mobile 5.0 Phone Edition for handling PDA and phone tasks. The cPC doesn't just rely on the dual processor/ OS design to innovate, it also has a passive digitizer (touch screen) running Windows XP 2005 Tablet Edition! This will provide a rich stylus-enabled experience for those times when end users are mobile and not docked."

This is a great idea - dock it and you get the keyboard experience with a monitor and all, pop it out of the dock and switch to mobile mode instantly, with an uber-smartphone. I can think of a few people who are probably going to want one of these...

Here's how DualCor puts it:

"Delivering the Holy Grail of Enterprise Mobility: 100% replication of the fully functional, fully connected, non-diluted, intra-enterprise desktop experience in a completely mobile hand-held device."

And I like the letter-opener style stylus (see the larger view of the image, above, by clicking on it).



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Geek Out | Mobile | Tablet PC | Tech
Sunday, 18 December 2005 23:02:11 (Pacific Standard Time, UTC-08:00)
#  

Too bad there's not a Windows Mobile device that truly rivals Blackberry's form-factor for durability and real-world practical power use (yet, that is) (in my humble opinion, that is), but I can continue to hold out hope for better PocketPC's now.

Why? Because the Windows Mobile OS (2005 version) will soon be getting a messaging security and feature pack update that will enable "push" technology for instant delivery of all your Exchange 2003 info (email, contacts, calendar, etc) to your Windows Mobile 2005 powered device. Exchange 2003 SP2 will enable the functionality on the server side.

So half my concerns about the PocketPC/SmartPhone editions of Windows Mobile will be alleviated - namely the always there, immeidate delivery story.

Funny thing... I was having coffee with a Microsoft friend just the other day. He asked me why I was still using a Blackberry (common question from my Microsoft acquaintances), and I didn't have to say much. My first argument was the lack of real-time push.sync (which we both knew was coming on with the next Exchange update and the Mobile update). He agreed with me in one respect, though: RIM got the form-factor figured out when they built these Blackberry things - nailed it right on the head. RIM's keyboard rocks, plain and simple.

Good going for the Windows Mobile team. Lord knows that whole Blackberry Connect thing has never really panned out (it's supposedly Blackberry software that runs on the Windows Mobile OS, but it's really not materialized anywhere to speak of).

But about those devices running Winodws Mobile... They need to be improved to really make them work and hold up. My idea? Simple. Microsoft doesn't make the hardware (they keep reminding us of this, and it's become more of an excuse than a reason over the past couple years, guys), but they do have some control and impact in that area. Microsoft should exercise some release management and licensing control over the hardware manufacturers - Perhaps they should specify some quality and usability requirements and license the OS first to those manufacturers that actually produce a better product. that meets some stringent requirements for usability, reliability, durability, performance and battery efficiency.

Important message to all companies looking to do handheld QWERTY keyboards: You might want to consider where you're going to spend your "innovating" funds. You might be best served to simply pay RIM however much they ask to use their keybord. Like, as in their actual keyboard, not some knock-off, lumpy chicklet version like on several of the Windows Mobile powered devices I have used in the past, or the river-rockish Treo keyboard (yuck). Just buy the technology from RIM - Their's ain't broke, nothing to fix or improve.

At any rate, looks like the possibilites continue to change and grow, and Microsoft's made a good move here. Glad to see it's coming to pass.



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Mobile | Tech
Tuesday, 07 June 2005 11:52:28 (Pacific Daylight Time, UTC-07:00)
#  

I've recently gone on a run of trying all kinds of new devices in the PDA/MobilePhone/Email-Enabled-Device arena. I have used various Blackberry devices for a few years now (and have been using the Blackberry phone devices since they were first born). I have occasionally moved to other devices to try them out and see if they would suffice for use in my work. Recently I undertook that sort of project, evaluating various mobile carriers and their networks and devices, so it's been a real gadget-land around these parts since around the first of the year.

I won't be writing about the networks and service providers (maybe some other time), but I did want to catalog some of what I encountered, the geeky part of the project: All these nifty mobile devices.

It's worth noting right up front that as a general rule, I've pretty much always been disappointed with more-than-just-a-phone devices whenever I've tried them, for one reason or another. My experience has been the same with most of this latest run of devices I have tested. Also, I wrote this entry/review over the course of the past couple months, going back to it periodically to document bits of my experience over time.

To cut to the chase, let me jump to the end of my story briefly: As of yesterday I am back (by choice) with a Blackberry phone from Cingular - the very same model of phone I had before this whole testing process started. It's a RIM 7290 device. And that's a choice I made after using a whole slew of what people say are the coolest, newest phone/PDA/email/whatever devices.

You know what they say - Once you've had Blackberry, you can never go backberry. Or, uh, something like that... Sorry. Bad joke. But it's true.

My recent device trials (and tribulations) have included the Audiovox 5600 smartphone running Windows Mobile 2003 from AT&T/Cingular (which has been the rage among bloggers the past several months - it's unofficial nickname is the "Scoble Phone") and the Blackberry 7100t phone from T-Mobile. I've also used the Blackberry 7100g (Cingular) and the PalmOne Treo 650, both from Cingular. Rounding out the list was the Siemens SX66 device, which has a slide-out keyboard and WiFi built in, running the PocketPC Phone Edition of Windows Mobile 2003.

In each case, there were things I liked about these devices, and there were things I didn't like.

Audiovox 5600 SmartPhone (running Windows Mobile 2003 - ATTWS/Cingular)

Audiovox_5600I'll give Audiovox kudos for making a really cool phone in the gadgety sense, but I have to give it lower scores in terms of it's practical utility. Keep in mind, I use this kind of device as a tool, one that I use constantly for communicating and staying in touch for work. The "Scoble Phone" has been hyped up as the only device you'll need to carry around, and it has all kinds of nifty things on it, like mobile MSN Messenger, Windows Media Player, the ability to use Mini-SD cards for tons of extra storage, a built-in still/motion camera (of very mediocre quality), etc. But the software apps are a little glitchy, and I lost count of how many times this thing either reset itself or required me to pry the battery out of the back and replace it in order to get it started and working again. On top of that, while the geek/nifty factor is fairly high (I can see how Windows Mobile is a useful and appealing mobile OS), the practical/regular use score is low - it just doesn't work that well for me, beyond its simple use as a phone and SMS device. Text input is T9, which is cumbersome at best and impractical for work. Bluetooth for hands-free use worked somewhat reliably, but was problematic from time to time. Audio quality was good. It's small and compact and has a certain "neato" quality. But it doesn't allow me to quickly and efficiently communicate, except via voice calls. I handed it back. I liked the phone, but it didn't work for me, not even close. And by the way - as of the time of this writing, Cingular is not offering the phone on its web site.

Blackberry 7100t (T-Mobile) and 7100g (Cingular)

Pho_blackberry_7100g_smallThese two devices are essentially identical in terms of the guts and the software running on them, but the Cingular device has a better form factor and body/shell - It's a lot more solid, the keyboard is laid out better and is easier to use, and I get a strong feeling it would last longer than the T-Mobile model in a durability sense. Text input is a unique hybrid type - the keyboard has a standard qwerty style layout like all Blackberry devices, but instead of one letter per key like others by RIM, the 7100 series has two characters per key. It does the predictive text thing, a lot like T9 does on a mobile phone keypad, but it's considerably more accurate and a lot faster to type with. Making the move from a standard-keyboard Blackberry to this device takes a little getting used to, but after a few days I found myself fairly comfortable with the layout. Bluetooth hands-free functionality was flawless and reliable - better than the Audiovox phone. RIM figured out some good things with this device, but there are a few things missing that keep it from being a truly killer device: There's no MP3 support like you get in the other phones tested, and the ear-piece audio level at max volume is painfully quiet (a common complain with Blackberry phones that really needs to be addressed). There's no camera, and since this is a biz-class device, that makes sense. But RIM should really consider building a model with a camera option, an SD slot, MP3 capabilities, an MP3 voice recorder, MSN instant messaging (they included Yahoo! and AOL on this one, so why the heck not), and better audio capabilities (ring tones, music, etc). In fact, a Windows Mobile device that actually shipped with the vaporware (to date) Blackberry Connect software package would have me running for the store. But, progress is progress, and all in all the 7100 is a pretty good tool that makes some improvements on earlier models. But hey, put the standard RIM keyboard back, please - if it ain't broke, well - you know... I returned both these devices as they were loaners, but I'd recommend them to others, and a few people I know have bought these recently - and they're thrilled with them.

PalmOne Treo 650 (ATTWS/Cingular)

Pho_palmone_treo650_smallTopping out in the community's collective Bling! category is the PalmOne Treo 650, a nice looking and feeling PalmOS-based SmartPhone with lots of counterintuitive functionality and mediocre documentation. Now I remember why I left the PalmOS behind a few years ago. You'd think I'd have remembered, but sometimes we just need to be reminded. This is another phone with a so-so-quality camera built in (better in overall image quality than the Audiovox 5600, but with the same low 640x480 resolution). It has a full keyboard built on, which is arguably it's most redeeming factor, but in daily use the keyboard feels lumpy, klutzy and crowded compared to any RIM/Blackberry device I have used. The Treo uses a touch screen and a slide-out stylus for screen navigation, as well as a set of directional and select buttons. The screen is bright and contrasty, which is nice. Battery life is fairly limited when you're actually using it. Call audio is excellent, and is louder in earpiece volume when compared to the other devices mentioned here. The email setup and use of multiple email programs ranks a "so-so" score, and overall it was clunky to use. I can't count how many clicks, scrolls and stylus gestures/touches it took to do even the simplest activities. If I am sitting in a chair, have some time, and have both hands completely free and nothing else to distract me, I can use this device. But I don't want to. Returned to sender, can't recommend it.

Siemens SX66 PocketPC Phone (running Windows Mobile 2003 - ATTWS/Cingular)

Pho_sie_sx66_smallI was excited about getting my hands on this device, and hopeful that it would meet my needs and satisfy the usability/utility requirements. I also hoped it would have Blackberry Connect software on it, as was advertised some places and rumored at others. It didn't have it, but I tried it anyhow. The first things I noticed was that I was able to use it with my Exchange server (the Audiovox device crapped out if I tried to use a "space" character in my password. I had thought [assumed] the inability to use a space in a password was a limitation of the OS, but this device proved me wrong). The screen on this thing is very nice, and the backlight is bright and contrasty. Bluetooth worked better than any of the other devices in hands-free mode, and the keyboard makes it more accessible and usable than the Audiovox device by far. But the keyboard's pimple-style chicklet bubble layout was painful to use in the real wold - keys are tiny and way too close together unless you;re six years old (probably not the target market). Battery life was pretty awful, especially if you use the WiFi at all. Even without using WiFi, the battery was dying on me regularly between charges, and since there's no USB charging with this thing I could not charge it in the car or anywhere convenient (You have to charge in the cradle, which is plugged into the wall via a power adapter, or you use the same wall plug adapter with a socket adapter to go straight to the device. So be prepared to be tangling the wall adapter cord up a lot to carry it with you everywhere, or else plan on a dead phone periodically - dumb). To top it all off, this morning I grabbed the device and went to turn it on, but it did not respond. Yet, the little green service light was flashing so I knew it had power to it. I pulled the battery put it back (the Windows Mobile version of CTRL-ALT-DEL), but still no response. I started driving to work and tried it again while I was stopped for coffee at the local store. Voila! Up it comes, but totally reset, nuked, blown away, default ROM settings - everything I had set and stored before was gone. Good thing the important stuff was on my SD card... I've read and heard rumors of serious software problems with this phone, and when you combine that with the lame keyboard that looks cool but isn't at all usable, well... Returned, with prejudice.

Back In Black - or, Right Black Where I Started From

Pho_blackberry_7290_smallSo, as of this morning I am back running on a Blackberry 7290 phone with the latest, solid Blackberry software. This is the same model I gave up a few months ago to do the testing. Sure, it's not as fancy in many ways as the 7100-series, but it's got the best keyboard and it works, works, works. And probably the best test of all was this: Within one minute of picking this thing back up and setting a couple of device options to something other than BB's defaults, I suddenly found myself orders of magnitude faster and more productive than I was with any of the other devices I'd tried.

RIM got something right when they built the Blackberry. Then they added a phone to the device. Then they did this funky keyboard thing with the 7100 that works pretty well. It works, and it is usable.

DontmakemethinkThere's a great book I've held onto for a few years now called "Don't Make Me Think" by author Steve Krug. It's all about usability (as related to web design, but that doesn't matter, the same concepts apply here). The reasons the Blackberry devices are all so good is because they are truly intuitive - I don't have to spend my time clicking and clicking and tapping and clicking just to try to find some simple function, and the user interface is so intuitive it becomes almost reflexive to use. RIM wins because their devices have utility. It's because they're reliable. It's because they're usable. I have confidence that RIM/Blackberry will keep that as their core philosophy, and so I am very much interested to see what will come next from the company.

But damnit, I still want to see and use a good, reliable phone that runs Windows Mobile latest edition, with Blackberry Connect software on it! PLEASE! There's a lot of room for growth, and it's not all about smaller, smaller, smaller, or geekier, geekier geekier... It's all about usable, usable, usable. Size is just one part of usability. Geeky is fun, but not always practical. Who will end up winning this game? Can't wait to see.

But for now, Blackberry's in the lead in my book.



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Mobile | Tech
Saturday, 16 April 2005 00:23:33 (Pacific Daylight Time, UTC-07:00)
#  

When Microsoft sets its sights on a market segment, look out. It'll happen, sooner or later.

I've been using a whole bunch of the latest mobile phones recently to test them and see how well they'll work for business use. The fact of the matter is, most of them pale in comparison to the Blackberry devices. Blackberries are great tools. All the others are great gadgets. At work, I need a great tool more than a great gadget.

But what I really want is the best of both worlds. Push email, real-time sync on email, calendar, and all that. Lookups live over the air from my company's active directory. MP3 player, phone, voice recorder, MP3 and poly ring-tones... and the RIM form factor works great - he typical PDA-phone running Windows Mobile is a little too goofy and unusable - especially in the keyboard area. Blackberry keyboards work great - the palmOne and PocketPC keyboards I have used - well, they just suck.

From Engadget, with reference to an article at Internet Week, word about the upcoming Windows Mobile 2005 and how Microsoft likely intends to compete with RIM's Blackberry devices - and server.

This will raise eyebrows and - if the Windows Mobile devices can be improved to be a better tool and less gadgety - it's entirely possible they could take away a lot of the market currently sufficiently served only by RIM...

Windows Mobile 2005 Magneto

If their recent deals to license their ActiveSync technology to Nokia, Symbian, and palmOne are any indication, Microsoft is working hard to steadily encircle the Blackberry with the next version of Windows Mobile, aka Windows Mobile 2005 aka Magneto. The plan? CRN reports that Microsoft is finally going to unveil Windows Mobile 2005 at the Mobile and Embedded Developers Conference in Las Vegas next month, and that they’re going to be taking a serious swipe at RIM by adding Blackberry-like support for push email and live content updating to Windows Mobile-powered Pocket PCs and Smartphones. The CrackBerry’s pretty damn entrenched, but Microsoft knows a thing or two about dislodging a market-dominating competitor, and so will be reviving a familiar tactic: to compete with RIM’s server product they’re going to be giving away their Exchange 2003 Server Pack 2 update, which adds support for push, for free.



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Mobile | Tech
Sunday, 03 April 2005 06:44:18 (Pacific Standard Time, UTC-07:00)
#  

Microsoft has announced a large number of security webcasts that are set for April. The list here is quite long, so click to see them all, or check out the Security Webcast Calendar, which is a Word doc calendar with all the upcoming webcasts listed and linked.

There are lots of very good sessions planned. Anyone with a security responsibility or emphasis in their jobs should take a good look at these upcoming webcasts and consider viewing...

Upcoming Security Webcasts: April 2005

Security Webcasts are a convenient way for IT Professionals and Developers to stay technically updated on the latest Microsoft Security Guidance. These webcasts concentrate on security information and are presented by senior executives and other subject matter experts. They feature interactive technical presentations, product demonstrations, and question-and-answer sessions.

Microsoft Security Webcast Series: Upcoming & On-Demand

Security Webcast Calendar

NEW: Now you can register for an on-demand webcast and choose how you would like to view the archive. Downloadable Microsoft Office System PowerPoint and .wmv files are available for most webcasts that took place Dec. 1, 2004 or later. Once you register, you will be directed to the on-demand webcast and also shortly receive a confirmation email with links to the PowerPoint and .wmv downloads.

Additional Webcast Resources

Microsoft Security Webcast Series:  Upcoming & On-Demand

Digital Blackbelt Series: Defend your code from attacks

Ongoing through May

How would your code stand up to an attack? If you are not sure, join us for the Digital Blackbelt webcast series as Developer Community Champion Joe Stagner discusses security risks, vulnerabilities, and solutions from the software developer's perspective. We will provide real-life examples and security tips and tricks that can help you gain the knowledge and techniques to become an experienced “blackbelt” in writing secure code.

Web Development: Increase the security of your applications

Ongoing through May

Increasing the security of your software is not the result of a single event. From design through development, to testing and deployment, a multi-disciplinary approach must be taken to deliver a quality software product that minimizes organizational risk. Join Dennis Hurst, Senior Consulting Engineer at SPI Dynamics, and other guest speakers as they detail knowledge that can help developers increase security around the coding of web applications. 

Security360

Third Tuesday of Every Month

Learn best practices to guide your security strategy during this monthly webcast series. Each webcast focuses on a specific security topic and includes commentary from industry experts outside of Microsoft.

Security Webcast Calendar

Security webcasts listed in an easy-to-use calendar format.

BONUS: Attend any live webcast through June and you could win a Portable Media Center. See official rules for more details.

Additional Live & On-Demand Webcast Series Available NOW:

For IT Executives

Microsoft Executive Circle Webcast: Security360 with Mike Nash: Secure E-mail, It’s More than Filtering (Level 100)

Tuesday, April 19, 2005 - 9:00 AM - 10:00 AM Pacific Time

Mike Nash, Corporate Vice President Security Business & Technology Unit, Microsoft

Reducing the amount of spam clogging e-mail systems is top-of-mind. However, e-mail security is not just about preventing unsolicited messages; it is also about protecting the digital information assets you send through e-mail. On this month's Security360, guest host Amy Roberts, director of product management in Microsoft's Security Business and Technology Unit, will discuss with industry experts the whole spectrum of e-mail security, including filtering technologies, e-mail policies and enforcement, and partner solutions. As with every Security360, this session includes a checklist of recommendations and resources, as well as a live Q&A with industry experts.

http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=43965

For IT Professionals

TechNet Webcast: Implementing Exchange Server Security (Part 1 of 2): Securing Services and Messaging Protocols (Level 300)

Monday, April 04, 2005 - 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM Pacific Time

Harold Wong, TechNet Presenter, Microsoft

Securing communication over networks is essential to securing your organization from intrusions, overloads, and interruptions of many types. In this first session of a two-part series on Exchange Server Security, we describe how to deploy a more secure Exchange Server 2003 infrastructure and how to secure its server services and messaging protocols.

http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=43587

TechNet Webcast: How Microsoft IT Deployed PKI Inside Microsoft (Level 300)

Tuesday, April 05, 2005 - 9:00 AM - 10:00 AM Pacific Time

Larry Talbot, Microsoft IT SECURITY TECHNOLOGIST, Microsoft

This webcast presents a detailed discussion of how Microsoft IT installed a Public Key Infrastructure, built originally with Windows 2000 Server Certificate Services, and later upgraded with Windows Server 2003, to implement a secure communications and remote authentication infrastructure. This enabled the use of S/MIME signatures and encryption, secured Web connections by using SSL or TLS, ensured the confidentiality of stored data by using EFS, ensured the confidentiality and integrity of transmitted date by using IPSec, and enabled strong network user authentication by using Smart Cards. Join this webcast to find out how you can do this - or something similar - too.

http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=44148

TechNet Webcast: "Ask The IT Security Experts" Series: Building Security Training and Awareness (Level 100)

Tuesday, April 05, 2005 - 11:00 AM - 12:00 PM Pacific Time

Ben Smith, Senior Security Strategist, Microsoft

Experts often talk about the importance and need for security training, but few actually talk about how to do it. Join us for this webcast as we bring together some of the sharpest security-focused Microsoft IT professionals to provide expert answers to your questions about Building Security Training and Awareness. This webcast presents proven, and slightly unconventional, methods of training users and administrators on security. As with all of our "Ask the Experts" webcasts, there will be plenty of Q&A time for the experts to field your questions. Send your security-related questions to our panel of experts ahead of time at: itxcast@microsoft.com.

http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=43974

TechNet Webcast: Network Isolation Using Group Policy and IPSec (Part 1 of 3): Overview of Internet Protocol Security (Level 300)

Wednesday, April 06, 2005 - 11:00 AM - 12:30 PM Pacific Time

John Baker, TechNet Presenter, Microsoft

Data Isolation: How can it make your IT infrastructure safer, and how do you use Group Policies and IPSec to implement it? This session is the first of a three-part series presenting the information and tasks needed to implement data isolation using Group Policies and IPSec within an organization. This first installation provides an overview of the nature of Internet Protocol Security - the challenges to secure network communication, how IPSec can help, and the various ways IPSec can be implemented to achieve different types of secure communication.

http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=43592

TechNet Webcast: Windows Server 2003 SP1 Technical Overview (Level 200)

Thursday, April 07, 2005 - 9:00 AM - 10:30 AM Pacific Time

Rand Morimoto, Author, President, Convergent Computing

Windows Server 2003, the latest server operating system from Microsoft, builds upon the security, reliability, and performance improvements implemented in previous versions. Organizations need these continuing improvements as their networks develop and network usage evolves with new technologies. Organizations also need Service Pack 1 to protect themselves from an increasing variety of network and computer. Join this webcast for a technical overview of Windows Server 2003 Service Pack 1, where we will present its features, configuration tools, system security enhancements, network security enhancements, and deployment options.

http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=43599

TechNet Webcast: SQL Server 2005 Series (Part 4 of 10): Securing your SQL Server (Level 200)

Monday, April 11, 2005 - 9:00 AM - 10:00 AM Pacific Time

Bryan Von Axelson, TechNet Presenter, Microsoft

Parts four and five in our series highlight the security enhancements in SQL Server 2005. Part four of this series focuses on authentication and authorization while crypto support is covered in part five. We begin with authentication, examining the Security model, endpoint-based authentication and the password policy. Then we move on to explore authorization, covering User Schema separation, module execution context, granular permission control and Catalog security.

http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=42448

TechNet Webcast: Implementing Exchange Server Security (Part 2 of 2): Protecting Against Unwanted E-Mail (Level 300)

Monday, April 11, 2005 - 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM Pacific Time

Chris Avis, TechNet Presenter, Microsoft

This second session of a two-part series on Exchange Server Security describes how to increase the security of e-mail that flows through an organization's Exchange servers. We also introduce you to Exchange Server 2003 features such as Real Time Block List support and Intelligent Message Filtering, tools making it easier to reduce the amount of unwanted e-mail before it spreads through your organization.

http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=43602

TechNet Webcast: How Microsoft IT Implements Trustworthy Messaging at Microsoft (Level 300)

Tuesday, April 12, 2005 - 9:00 AM - 10:00 AM Pacific Time

Grant Hogan, Microsoft IT Service Manager, Microsoft

Similar to most enterprise organizations, Microsoft shares information among its resources through e-mail and other electronic documentation. At the same time, we have a concern for the security and privacy of this data. With that in mind, Microsoft created the Trustworthy Messaging initiative to provide confidentiality for key business sensitive data sent to and from internal corporate clients without sacrificing their ability to freely share this data. Join us as we review, in detail, Microsoft IT's implementation of Trustworthy Messaging.

http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=44151

TechNet Webcast: Information about Microsoft's April Security Bulletins (Level 100)

Wednesday, April 13, 2005 - 11:00 AM - 12:00 PM Pacific Time

Christopher Budd, CISM, CISSP/Security Program Manager, Microsoft

Debby Fry Wilson, Director/Security Response Marketing, Microsoft

On April 12th, Microsoft will release its monthly security bulletins. Join this webcast for a brief overview of the technical details of these April security bulletins.  This webcast will provide you the opportunity to raise your questions and concerns about the security bulletins. A majority of the session will be devoted to addressing your questions and providing answers from our security experts.

http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=43750

TechNet Webcast: Network Isolation Using Group Policy and IPSec (Part 2 of 3): Understanding Network Isolation Using IPSec (Level 300)

Wednesday, April 13, 2005 - 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM Pacific Time

John Baker, TechNet Presenter, Microsoft

This session is the second of a three-part series with the information and tasks you need to implement data isolation using Group Policies and IPSec. This session shows how to use IPSec to create network isolation zones. Topics include the advantages and limitations of network isolation, where network isolation fits into a defense-in-depth scheme, and how to use Group Policies and Active Directory groups to restrict access to specific servers.

http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=43606

TechNet Webcast: Maximizing Security Features within Microsoft Office Live Communications Server 2005 (Level 300)

Thursday, April 14, 2005 - 9:00 AM - 10:30 AM Pacific Time

Sean Olson, Lead Program Manager, Microsoft

This technical session describes potential security threats and their mitigations for the Microsoft Office Live Communications Server 2005 release. We will focus on the new features and challenges differentiated from Live Communications Server 2003. The ultimate goal of this presentation is to provide you with the information commonly required to satisfy a security audit of a product prior to its commercial deployment. Topics will include authentication, auditing, and security recommendations for the new Live Communications Server 2005.

http://msevents.microsoft.com/CUI/EventDetail.aspx?EventID=1032269267&Culture=en-US

TechNet Webcast: Securing the Network Perimeter with ISA Server 2004 (Level 200)

Friday, April 15, 2005 - 11:00 AM - 12:30 PM Pacific Time

Keith Combs, TechNet Presenter, Microsoft

Do you currently have an effective way to secure your network perimeter against risks introduced by the Internet, remote users, and remote network segments? Learn how Microsoft Internet Security and Acceleration (ISA) Server 2004 can help protect against all of these threats and more. This session demonstrates how ISA Server 2004 can enhance security for internal servers as well as external-facing resources such as Microsoft Exchange Server or Microsoft Internet Information Services. We will also show how ISA Server can operate as a virtual private networking server for more secure remote access to the internal network.

http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=43759

TechNet Webcast: SQL Server 2005 Series (Part 5 of 10): Protecting Sensitive Data (Level 200)

Monday, April 18, 2005 - 9:00 AM - 10:00 AM Pacific Time

Bryan Von Axelson, TechNet Presenter, Microsoft

Parts four and five in our series highlight the security enhancements in SQL Server 2005. Building upon the discussion of authentication and authorization in the previous session, part five of the series covers the crypto support in SQL Server 2005. We begin with an introduction to the concepts of database encryption including encryption support, keys, certificates and key management. We show how SQL 2005 can protect sensitive data using data encryption and module signatures, and introduce sign modules, what these are and how they work.

http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=42450

TechNet Webcast: Assessing Network Security (Part 1 of 2): Planning and Research (Level 200)

Monday, April 18, 2005 - 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM Pacific Time

Kai Axford, Security Specialist, Microsoft

How do you know whether your network is secure? And how do you know how to find out? This session is the first of a two-part series to help organizations plan and implement processes to identify vulnerabilities to network attacks. This first session shows how to plan your security assessment and how to gather information such that the methods and results fit your organization's needs. In this presentation we'll specifically show how to plan a security assessment and the details and processes for gathering network security information about your organization.

http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=43762

TechNet Webcast: Threat Mitigation for Windows 98 and Windows NT 4.0 (Level 200)

Wednesday, April 20, 2005 - 9:00 AM - 10:30 AM Pacific Time

Harold Wong, Senior Technology Specialist, Microsoft

While migration to a newer platform is recommended, many customers have key business applications that will only run on legacy operating systems. This session offers prescriptive information and test plans for hardening legacy Windows clients and servers, with the goal of reducing the security risk factors for Windows NT and Windows 98 systems as much as possible. We also provide guidance on how to upgrade securely to newer operating systems.

http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=43789

TechNet Webcast: Network Isolation Using Group Policy and IPSec (Part 3 of 3): Advanced Network Isolation Scenarios (Level 300)

Wednesday, April 20, 2005 - 11:00 AM - 12:00 PM Pacific Time

Matthew Hester, TechNet Presenter, Microsoft

This session is the final presentation of a three-part series about the information and tasks needed to implement data isolation using Group Policies and IPSec within an organization. The session describes several scenarios where you can use IPSec to enhance network security by using IPSec to create network isolation zones. This scenario-focused view of Group Policies and IPSec is based on Microsoft's prescriptive guidance.

http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=43792

TechNet Webcast: Assessing Network Security (Part 2 of 2): Penetration Testing (Level 200)

Monday, April 25, 2005 - 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM Pacific Time

Kai Axford, Security Specialist, Microsoft

How do you know whether your network is secure? And how do you know how to find out? This session is the second of a two-part series on assessing network security, to help organizations plan and implement processes to identify vulnerabilities to network attacks. This second session shows how to implement penetration testing for intrusive network attacks, presents checklists that will help identify and remediate common issues, the tools and processes for scanning systems for vulnerabilities, and concludes with a case study where all these factors are put to work at a typical commercial enterprise.

http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=43818

TechNet Webcast: Security Risk Management (Level 300)

Wednesday, April 27, 2005 - 9:00 AM - 10:30 AM Pacific Time

Kai Axford, Security Specialist, Microsoft

When establishing security for your network, you must take risk assessment, cost-benefit analysis, and implementation of security countermeasures into account. The Security Risk Management Guide, designed by Microsoft, can help your organization establish the ongoing process of security risk management. This 90-minute webcast presents a qualitative approach to risk management, tying in best practices from both the industry as well as the ones learned and formulated by the Microsoft internal IT Group.

http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=43821

TechNet Webcast: Defense-in-Depth Against Malicious Software (Level 200)

Friday, April 29, 2005 - 11:00 AM - 12:30 PM Pacific Time

Michael Murphy, TechNet Presenter, Microsoft

Malicious software has become increasingly advanced; worms and viruses can propagate more quickly and evade detection more effectively. This session describes how a defense-in-depth approach to antivirus solution design can help protect various components of a computing infrastructure from malicious software attacks, including client computers, servers and networking devices. This webcast also covers implementing an effective outbreak control and recovery plan and identifying, containing and remedying the effects of malicious software.

http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=43841

For Developers

MSDN Webcast: Practical Security for Intranet Solutions (Level 200)

Friday, April 01, 2005 - 9:00 AM - 10:30 AM Pacific Time

Joe Stagner, Developer Community Champion, Microsoft

Internal Web and Windows-based applications often require integration with existing applications and systems, access to databases, strong authorization and authentication mechanisms, and identity management. This webcast discusses strategies for incorporating security best practices into intranet solution development. We will provide practical guidance on how to implement security enhancements throughout intranet solutions and introduce future security improvements available to developers through Visual Studio .NET 2005 and ASP.NET 2.0.

http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=43408

MSDN Webcast: Practical Security for Internet and Extranet Solutions (Level 200)

Monday, April 04, 2005 - 11:00 AM - 12:30 PM Pacific Time

Rob Jackson, Developer Community Champion, Microsoft

This session discusses strategies for incorporating security best practices into intranet solution development. Internal Web and Windows-based applications often require integration with existing applications and systems, access to databases, strong authorization and authentication mechanisms, and identity management. This session provides practical guidance on how to implement security enhancements throughout intranet solutions and introduces future improvements available to developers through Visual Studio .NET 2005 and ASP .NET 2.0.

http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=43832

MSDN Webcast: Implementing Security for Mobile Device Solutions (Level 200)

Friday, April 08, 2005 - 9:00 AM - 10:30 AM Pacific Time

Joe Stagner, Developer Community Champion, Microsoft

Are you dealing with security issues and concerns with your Microsoft Windows Mobile-based solutions? This webcast will describe the various the security considerations for building mobile software solutions and the tools, technologies and strategies available to the mobile developer. Both traditional applications accessed through mobile devices and solutions designed specifically for mobile use can be affected. You will learn how to use the security features of the Microsoft .NET Compact Framework in conjunction with Windows Mobile-based PocketPC and Smartphone capabilities to provide more secure file storage and data access. During this 90-minute webcast will also cover how to protect mobile device communications with your application servers.

http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=43585

MSDN Webcast: Digital Blackbelt Series: Defending the Database (Part 1 of 2): The SQL Injection Attack in Detail (Level 300)

Friday, April 08, 2005 - 11:00 AM - 12:30 PM Pacific Time

Joe Stagner, Developer Community Champion, Microsoft

Developers the world over underestimate the seriousness of a SQL Injection Attack. In this session we will dive deep into the topic and do some live hacks to see the huge danger of SQL Injection.  We'll discuss how a Mal-Tech might find and approach your box, discover your schema, table, and field names, steal your data, corrupt your table records, add himself as an administrator, reduce your own admin rights, pollute your network, take over your mail server, shutdown your application (and hide it from your ops people), upload his own wares and OWN YOUR NETWORK. Don't miss this webcast.

http://msevents.microsoft.com/CUI/EventDetail.aspx?EventID=1032267306&Culture=en-US

MSDN Webcast: Writing Secure Code (Part 1 of 2): Best Practices (Level 200)

Monday, April 11, 2005 - 11:00 AM - 12:00 PM Pacific Time

Rob Jackson, Developer Community Champion, Microsoft

Do you want to learn more about analyzing, mitigating and modeling threats? This presentation is part one of a two-part series to help experienced developers build their knowledge of secure coding best practices. Join this 60-minute webcast to learn about established threat modeling methodologies and tools and how to apply them with other best practices to minimize vulnerabilities and limit damage from attacks.

http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=43835

MSDN Webcast: Assessment: Tips and Tricks for Web Application Security Testing (Level 300)

Tuesday, April 12, 2005 - 11:00 AM - 12:00 PM Pacific Time

Dennis Hurst, Senior Consulting Engineer, SPI Dynamics

Caleb Sima, Founder and CTO, SPI Dynamics

This session will demonstrate the proper technique for testing a Web application to ensure that it is properly secure. In addition, we will discuss the challenges of Web application security throughout the development life cycle, and the available methods and tools used to test the security of Web-based applications. Attend this webcast and learn how to test a Web application using a Web browser and the inherent limitations of this approach. You'll also learn what obstacles must be overcome during application testing to ensure proper security.

http://msevents.microsoft.com/CUI/EventDetail.aspx?EventID=1032267633&Culture=en-US 

MSDN Webcast: Developing Applications in Windows XP Service Pack 2 (Level 200)

Friday, April 15, 2005 - 9:00 AM - 10:30 AM Pacific Time

Rob Jackson, Developer Community Champion, Microsoft

Have you installed Microsoft Windows XP Service Pack 2 (SP2) and some of your applications are not working or are not working correctly? The new security features of SP2 may affect how certain types of applications run. Join this webcast to see examples of applications that may be affected and learn how to modify them to work with Windows XP SP2. Also, learn how to configure your development environment to work successfully on Windows XP SP2.

http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=43793

MSDN Webcast: Writing Secure Code (Part 2 of 2): Best Practices (Level 200)

Monday, April 18, 2005 - 11:00 AM - 12:00 PM Pacific Time

Anand Iyer, Developer Community Champion, Microsoft

Are you looking for effective strategies to defend against common security threats faced by application developers? In part two of this two-part series for experienced developers, you will continue learning more about established best practices for applying security principles throughout the development process. During the 60-minute webcast we will discuss common security threats faced by application developers, such as buffer overruns, cross-site scripting and denial of service attacks, and how to effectively defend against these threats.

http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=44153 

MSDN Webcast: Advanced Application Development with Windows XP Service Pack 2 (Level 400)

Friday, April 22, 2005 - 9:00 AM - 10:30 AM Pacific Time

Rob Jackson, Developer Community Champion, Microsoft

With Microsoft Windows XP Service Pack 2 (SP2), Microsoft is introducing a set of security technologies that will help improve Windows XP-based computers' ability to withstand malicious attacks from viruses and worms.  To developers these technologies will have an impact on the applications they create and the tools they use.  SP2 restricts how remote procedure calls are made across a network which may affect the operation of enterprise applications. Join this session as we discuss these interface restrictions and provide you with advanced application development techniques for SP2, including how to reduce RPC-based incompatibilities.

http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=43812

MSDN Webcast: Digital Blackbelt Series: Defending the Database (Part 2 of 2): Making the Right Design Choices (Level 300)

Friday, April 22, 2005 - 11:00 AM - 12:00 PM Pacific Time

Joe Stagner, Developer Community Champion, Microsoft

After drilling down into the infamous SQL Injection attack in Part 1 of the Defending the Database, we will now address several of the questions and answers developers have concerning the database and security.  This session will cover topics such as, Secure Connections, SQL versus Windows Authentication, user versus role-based authentication, EXPs, Managed Stored Procedures, Alerts and Monitors.

http://msevents.microsoft.com/CUI/EventDetail.aspx?EventID=1032267315&Culture=en-US 

MSDN Webcast: Implementing Security in the Development Lifecycle (Level 200)

Monday, April 25, 2005 - 11:00 AM - 12:30 PM Pacific Time

Joe Stagner, Developer Community Champion, Microsoft

Security should be your primary concern throughout the development process. This session discusses how security can be implemented at each stage of the software development life cycle. Microsoft has created the Security Development Life Cycle to describe how to implement security best practices by adding pointed and well-defined checkpoints to the existing development life cycle. This session outlines recommended changes to the design, development, testing, verification and release phases that can reduce the number and severity of security vulnerabilities shipped to customers.

http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=43816

MSDN Webcast: Remediation: Developing Secure ASP.NET Applications (Level 300)

Tuesday, April 26, 2005 - 11:00 AM - 12:00 PM Pacific Time

Dennis Hurst, Senior Consulting Engineer, SPI Dynamics

Prashant Sridharan , Lead Product Manager - VS, Microsoft

Are you looking for a way to correctly validate input easily and quickly to ensure it is secure? This webcast will show you real-life examples and demonstrate how you can do this.  Throughout the webcast we will discuss secure state management, how to apply state management across multiple applications, as well as how to setup and develop proper authorization and access control to ensure that privilege escalation defects/vulnerabilities are removed. Attend this webcast to learn advanced Web application protection techniques covering how to code login forms and other form inputs so they are immune to malicious brute force attacks.

http://msevents.microsoft.com/CUI/EventDetail.aspx?EventID=1032267641&Culture=en-US 

MSDN Webcast: Practical Security for Intranet Solutions (Level 200)

Friday, April 29, 2005 - 9:00 AM - 10:30 AM Pacific Time

Joe Stagner, Developer Community Champion, Microsoft

Internal Web and Windows-based applications often require integration with existing applications and systems, access to databases, strong authorization and authentication mechanisms, and identity management. This webcast discusses strategies for incorporating security best practices into intranet solution development. We will provide practical guidance on how to implement security enhancements throughout intranet solutions and introduce future security improvements available to developers through Visual Studio .NET 2005 and ASP.NET 2.0.

http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=43913

Additional Webcast Resources 



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IT Security | Tech
Wednesday, 23 March 2005 22:54:28 (Pacific Standard Time, UTC-08:00)
#  

This is a test of a photo attachment weblog post sent to dasBlog via email from a Treo 650 smartphone. The Treo is kind of cool, but Cleo (the cat) is cooler. :)

Note: Unfortunately, due to a bug of some kind I had to intervene on the mail server and manually delete the email post for this entry, because it kept reposting to the blog every few minutes. Oh well - at least I know the posting from the treo works!


Photo_031105_005.jpg



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Mobile
Saturday, 12 March 2005 04:48:00 (Pacific Standard Time, UTC-08:00)
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You knew the day would come, and Windows Mobile will continue to get better and better:

Engadget: A full 48.1% of all non-smartphone PDAs sold in the third quarter of this year run on some flavor of Windows CE (mainly the Pocket PC operating system), while Palm-powered PDAs accounted for only 29.8% of sales, a pretty significant decline from the same period last year.

Windows Mobile is cool, on PDAs and SmartPhones. The hardware gets better and better. The multitude of touch points and common apps between the Windows desktop OS versions and the mobile platform OS make Windows Mobile an integrated and usable system, and therefore valuable to end users. On top of that, they've done a very good job making it look and feel nice. It's got the electronic bling, if you will, that other handheld operating systems are at least partially missing.



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Mobile | Tech
Sunday, 14 November 2004 19:19:12 (Pacific Standard Time, UTC-08:00)
#  

I know he didn't mean to (so I won't act all flattered or smug or anything), but Robert Scoble just sort of summed up the better part of my topic/category list for this-here-blog of mine, over on his blog...

I thought it would be interesting to compare his list of cool upcoming topics for the future to what's categorized or searchable right now on my site. So, I did just that and have added the links, below. Not a bad start, and it points out to me where I am falling shorter than I had realized in my content. Hey Robert, thanks for the copy. :-)

“For the next 18 months, where are the business opportunities going to lie? Tablet PC. Bigtime. Windows Media Center. Gonna be a big deal. SmartPhones. Wanna watch how fast the Motorola MPX220 sells when it's released in the next few months? Xbox Live. You only need to say one number and everyone knows exactly the Xbox thing I'm talking about: "2." Visual Studio 2005. Tons of stuff coming there. MSN has a whole raft of things up their sleeves. And we haven't even started talking about BizTalk, SharePoint, Exchange, SQL Server, 64-bit Windows, SBS, CRM, LiveMeeting, and OneNote, among other things.”

It also gives me a gut-check on my existing blog categories. Here they are, with the ones that apply to this posting checked:



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Blogging | Mobile | Office 2003 | OneNote | SharePoint | Tablet PC | Tech | Windows Media Technology
Thursday, 23 September 2004 12:51:30 (Pacific Daylight Time, UTC-07:00)
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A few months ago I got excited about the forthcoming Motorola MPx phone - a PDA/mobile-phone unit running the Windows Mobile OS and sporting a true HTML browser, WiFi, etc. Well the story is even better now, by a long shot:

Research in Motion announced a couple of weeks ago (now how did I miss that?) that the MPx and MPx220 will include BlackBerry Connect capability, meaning the MPx will be a full-blown Pocket PC PDA (Windows Mobile OS), a telephone, and a Blackberry device. The MPx220 (the smaller SmartPhone that will get the software) is a quad-band device - I am going to have to assume for now that the MPx is what their spec sheet (PDF) shows: GSM 900/1800/1900 and GPRS.

I bet it costs a fortune, but I'll keep my fingers crossed. This is exactly the type of device needed for companies that have people who travel a lot, have to be constantly in touch, need the immediacy of Blackberry email but want to be able to kick a PowerPoint presentation onto the screen and have it really work, or view and make some simple edits to a spreadsheet, or browse the intranet or Internet. Who needs a laptop? The QWERTY keyboard is just right. I like the rumor of a dual-hinge capability - supposedly it can open hinging on either the long side or the short side, depending on what you want to do with it. The image look like that's true too, although they all seem to show it its long-side pose.

What the MPx will have:

  • GSM 900/1800/1900; GPRS
  • Dimensions: 3.9 x 2.4 x 0.9 inches; 99.7 X 61.2 X 24 mm
  • Weight: 6.1 oz; 174 g
  • Up to 180 minutes talk time
  • Up to 140 hours standby time
  • Integrated 1.2 megapixel camera with flash
  • 2.8” 240 x 320 color touch TFT screen for easy data input that also works with a stylus
  • Multi-function QWERTY keyboard with touch screen that also works with stylus
  • Opens in portrait view for phone use, PDA applications and games
  • Built-in Wi-Fi: embedded 802.11b wireless networking
  • Microsoft Outlook on the PocketPC
  • Integrated Bluetooth Wireless Technology
  • SD/MMC slot up to 1 GB
  • Compatible with all Microsoft Pocket PC applications
  • WAP and HTML browsing, streaming video and audio
  • Multi-Media Messaging Service (MMS)
  • IrDA (Infra red) and Built-in "ActiveSync" protocol
  • Connectivity via IrDA, USB, Wi-Fi, Bluetooth

If anyone happens to read this who know when and where it will be available (aside from “second-half of '04” that is), comment or email me.

What do you think? What would make the perfect device that could replace a laptop, phone and PDA? Comment your thoughts below.

(...by the way, companies that put search functions on their web sites should only do it if it works worth a darn. Compare this search with the same one in Google... Argh!)



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Mobile | Tech
Saturday, 14 August 2004 16:04:31 (Pacific Daylight Time, UTC-07:00)
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SanDisk Corp. said it would begin shipping a Secure Digital card combining flash memory and WiFi connectivity beginning next month.

Okay, now that's a cool idea. Stick that in your SmartPhone and you're in good shape maybe without using expensive GPRS KBytes (and its faster).

That or a new phone and maybe the Blackberry can go.



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Tech
Tuesday, 01 June 2004 03:45:48 (Pacific Daylight Time, UTC-07:00)
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There are a number of technological leaps I have not yet made, many of which are pretty commonplace nowadays. Most who know me look at me as one of those guys who's always first to acquire and use new technology, but in some cases that's just not true.

Here are a few facts about me and technology adoption, and where I see myself in the near future with regard to each:

  • I don't own an MP3 player - In fact, I never have. Sure I've listened to MP3s on my computer before (but not nearly as much as everyone else I know). I have not jumped on the MP3 wagon yet. I do digital media for sure - I've run Windows Media servers at work for a few years now, I have a hacked TiVo at home and have even put together my own PVR before, and I've used a Pocket PC and Smartphone in the past (both of which can play MP3s with Mobile Windows Media Player), but never have I actually owned an MP3 player. My boss once told me about how he uses audible.com, which is a cool service where you can download electronic books and stuff. That may be what eventually gets me to buy one. We'll see. iPods are looking pretty cool to me.
  • I don't yet do IP telephony - This is an area I was exploring earlier today, and it's what got me thinking about the things I have not yet bought into. I was researching Vonage phone service and features, after I started playing with the idea of audio blogging (Maybe you can see the connection, I know it's a stretch, but that's how I got from virtual-there to virtual-here, so to speak). This is something I am seriously considering trying out. Vonage not only now allows you to have a IP phone bridge device for your normal phone to plug into, they also support installing and using a software phone on the laptop (or whatever computer you like). I like the idea of being able to travel and have my phone ring on my laptop when I am logged in. They also have some cool voice mail features, including delivery of voice mails as email attachments and the ability to access your voice mail on the web. Now, how cool is that?
  • Picture/Audio/Video Blogging - I know this is not exactly something that everyone's doing, but when it comes to my list of things I think I should have done by now, this is definitely on it. I've wanted to do picture blogging for some time, but I don't have a camera phone (I use a blackberry phone since that's what really meets my hectic needs and work-style). The idea of being able to record an audio blog entry, however, is pretty cool to me - and if I could combine a camera-phone image with called-in audio recording and post them together, well that would be really cool. I'm definitely looking into this. Not sure what practical use it has, but it sounds like fun to me. Oh, and it has to work with dasBlog, which has a number of interfaces for getting remotely submitted blog entries created. For audio blogging on the road, I am looking at AudioBlog.com (Looks awesome and just went into closed beta release - I've applied) and AudBlog.com (which I have already tried, and while it's kind of cool, it just doesn't seem to work too well for my needs - and it's a bit limited in terms of what you get for the buck). Fun stuff, coming soon I hope.
  • Windows XP Media Center PC - I have been saying I want to get a Media Center PC for quite a while now, but still have not done so. With the new possibilities created by Microsoft's planned releases of new networked/connected Media Center “extender” devices, the level of desire has been continually increasing on my part. I need to buy a new computer for home anyhow (mine's pretty much dead), but I guess my only fear is that before too long some new OS and the accompanying mega-hardware requirements will replace what's on the market now. I dunno - I'll have to keep thinking about this one.


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Blogging | Tech | Windows Media Technology
Sunday, 09 May 2004 22:26:14 (Pacific Daylight Time, UTC-07:00)
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Motorola MPxLooks like maybe the future is starting to look up for PocketPC-based phones.

I used a Motorola SmartPhone (MPX200) for a while, but gave up on it because of poor performance in the Exchange sync department (on the part of the phone, which bogged down under the pressure).

As far as T9 text input has come, it drove me crazy trying to type email on a phone keyboard, so I switched back to the Blackberry Phone, which does a great job for me and others where I work. It just doesn't run the Windows Mobile OS.

MPx keyboard viewBut, looks like Motorola has some new models up its sleeve. While the new SmartPhone (MPx100) looks interesting, the new MPx PDA-Phone looks very cool. With a full keboard built-in, a true HTML browser, WiFi built in, etc., I'll be all over this (if it ever makes it to the US, that is). Availability is set for 2nd half of 2004 according to Motorola's press releases.



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Mobile | Tech
Monday, 26 April 2004 03:39:31 (Pacific Daylight Time, UTC-07:00)
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