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7 entries found for lose.

lose   Audio pronunciation of "lose" ( P )  Pronunciation Key  (lz)
v. lost, (lôst, lst) los·ing, los·es
v. tr.
  1. To be unsuccessful in retaining possession of; mislay: He's always losing his car keys.
    1. To be deprived of (something one has had): lost her art collection in the fire; lost her job.
    2. To be left alone or desolate because of the death of: lost his wife.
    3. To be unable to keep alive: a doctor who has lost very few patients.
  2. To be unable to keep control or allegiance of: lost his temper at the meeting; is losing supporters by changing his mind.
  3. To fail to win; fail in: lost the game; lost the court case.
  4. To fail to use or take advantage of: Don't lose a chance to improve your position.
  5. To fail to hear, see, or understand: We lost the plane in the fog. I lost her when she started speaking about thermodynamics.
    1. To let (oneself) become unable to find the way.
    2. To remove (oneself), as from everyday reality into a fantasy world.
  6. To rid oneself of: lost five pounds.
  7. To consume aimlessly; waste: lost a week in idle occupations.
  8. To wander from or become ignorant of: lose one's way.
    1. To elude or outdistance: lost their pursuers.
    2. To be outdistanced by: chased the thieves but lost them.
  9. To become slow by (a specified amount of time). Used of a timepiece.
  10. To cause or result in the loss of: Failure to reply to the advertisement lost her the job.
  11. To cause to be destroyed. Usually used in the passive: Both planes were lost in the crash.
  12. To cause to be damned.

v. intr.
  1. To suffer loss.
  2. To be defeated.
  3. To operate or run slow. Used of a timepiece.

Phrasal Verb:
lose out
To fail to achieve or receive an expected gain.

Idioms:
lose it Slang
  1. To lose control; blow up.
  2. To become deranged or mentally disturbed.
  3. To become less capable or proficient; decline.
lose out on
To miss (an opportunity, for example).
lose time
  1. To operate too slowly. Used of a timepiece.
  2. To delay advancement.


[Middle English losen, from Old English losian, to perish, from los, loss. See leu- in Indo-European Roots.]

[Download Now or Buy the Book]
Source: The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition
Copyright © 2000 by Houghton Mifflin Company.
Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

lose

In addition to the idioms beginning with lose, also see get (lose) one's bearings; keep (lose) one's cool; keep (lose) track; win some, lose some. Also see under losing; lost.


Source: The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer.
Copyright © 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.

Main Entry: lose
Pronunciation: 'lüz
Function: transitive verb
Inflected Form: lost /'lost/; los·ing
1 : to suffer deprivation of : part with especially in an unforeseen or accidental manner <lose a leg in an auto crash>
2 a : to suffer deprivation through the death or removal of or final separation from (a person) <lost a son in the war> b : to fail to keep (a patient) from dying <have lost many fewer pneumonia cases since penicillin came into use>


Source: Merriam-Webster's Medical Dictionary, © 2002 Merriam-Webster, Inc.

lose

v 1: fail to keep or to maintain; cease to have, either physically or in an abstract sense; "She lost her purse when she left it unattended on her seat" [ant: keep] 2: fail to win; "We lost the battle but we won the war" [ant: win] 3: suffer the loss of a person through death or removal; "She lost her husband in the war"; "The couple that wanted to adopt the child lost her when the biological parents claimed her" 4: place (something) where one cannot find it again; "I misplaced my eyeglasses" [syn: misplace, mislay] 5: miss from one's possessions; lose sight of; "I've lost my glasses again!" [ant: find] 6: allow to go out of sight; "The detective lost the man he was shadowing after he had to stop at a red light" 7: fail to make money in a business; make a loss or fail to profit; "I lost thousands of dollars on that bad investment!"; "The company turned a loss after the first year" [syn: turn a loss] [ant: profit, break even] 8: fail to get or obtain; "I lost the opportunity to spend a year abroad" [ant: acquire] 9: retreat [syn: fall back, drop off, fall behind, recede] [ant: gain] 10: fail to perceive or to catch with the senses or the mind; "I missed that remark"; "She missed his point"; "We lost part of what he said" [syn: miss] 11: be set at a disadvantage; "This author really suffers in translation" [syn: suffer]


Source: WordNet ® 2.0, © 2003 Princeton University

lose



<jargon> (MIT) 1. To fail. A program loses when it
encounters an exceptional condition or fails to work in the
expected manner.

2. To be exceptionally unesthetic or crocky.

3. Of people, to be obnoxious or unusually stupid (as opposed
to ignorant).

4. Refers to something that is losing, especially in the
phrases "That's a lose!" and "What a lose!"

[Jargon File]

(1995-04-19)


Source: The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing, © 1993-2005 Denis Howe

lose

vi. 1. [very common] To fail. A program loses when it
encounters an exceptional condition or fails to work in the expected
manner. 2. To be exceptionally unesthetic or crocky. 3. Of people,
to be obnoxious or unusually stupid (as opposed to ignorant). See
also deserves to lose. 4. n. Refers to something that is
losing, especially in the phrases "That's a lose!" and "What a
lose!"


Source: Jargon File 4.2.0

lose

lose: in CancerWEB's On-line Medical Dictionary


Source: On-line Medical Dictionary, © 1997-98 Academic Medical Publishing & CancerWEB

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