Sunday, January 04, 2009

Mark Minasi is a true character, and always a fun guy to have a conversation with. While in Las Vegas at the Connections conference Richard Campbell and I had a couple fun discussions with Mark, including one on the concept of Cloud Computing, and in the context of Microsoft's recent Azure announcement.

Mark's take on the whole cloud-computing thing is an interesting one. You can listen to our conversation with him via the RunAs Radio show link (Site|MP3).

While you're at it, you might also be interested in our other interview discussion with Mark that we did in Vegas, in which we covered (sort of, and among many other random things) Windows 7 (Site|MP3). It's a little crazy and chaotic, but was also a lot of fun.

Enjoy.



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RunAs Radio | Tech
Sunday, January 04, 2009 12:17:39 PM (Pacific Standard Time, UTC-08:00)
#  
 Wednesday, October 22, 2008

The fall conference season is upon us, and I'll be off to Barcelona on the first of November for a week at the Microsoft TechEd Europe/Middle East/Asia conference. I'll be joining my friend and colleague, Richard Campbell, there for the week. If by chance you'll also be there, be sure to let me know ahead of time!

Then, the following week Richard and I will both be traveling to Las Vegas for the Connections conference, where we'll be doing a live RunAs Radio recording session. Should be fun, and we have a great guest slated. More on that later.

If you'll be at either conference, please let me know via a comment or an email!



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RunAs Radio | Tech
Tuesday, October 21, 2008 11:36:00 PM (Pacific Standard Time, UTC-08:00)
#  
 Thursday, October 16, 2008

My friend Richard Campbell and I spent the morning recording a couple episodes of RunAs Radio for publication in the near future. One of our guests (whom we shall reveal when the show is published) provided some amazingly great information about using Performance Monitor, or "perfmon" for short. He's a perfmon Ninja, really. I'm excited about that show because I think when it comes up I think people will be able to learn something quite useful, as it includes some desktop video (perfmon is, after all, a very visual tool) and other resources. I think you'll like it.

Needless to say, both of us have been playing with perfmon for the past hour. Richard just IM'ed me with a funny situation, though:

Not really sure how that works. :)

So, be sure to check out RunAs Radio for the Performance Monitor show, which will be published sometime in the next couple weeks. We've also had a number of other great guests sit down with us over the past while, talking about some very useful topics suited for IT professionals. So check it out!



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Humor | RunAs Radio | Tech
Thursday, October 16, 2008 12:18:14 PM (Pacific Standard Time, UTC-08:00)
#  
 Thursday, September 18, 2008

I wasn't going to write anything about the new Microsoft commercials, which I really like, despite the fact that I wrote about the two Seinfeld/Gates commercials.

But then I realized that the PC Guy in the commercials is Sean Siler. He's a real tech guy who actually works at Microsoft for a living - as opposed to being a professional actor. Here's his TechNet blog.

In fact, Sean epitomizes the "I'm a PC" message. We interviewed him not too long ago for RunAs Radio on the topic of IPv6 (he's the program manager for IPv6 at Microsoft). I thought you might be interested in hearing what Sean had to say at that time. He's wicked smart and a fun conversation.

It sounds like it's been an interesting evening for Sean, but he took the time to exchange a couple emails with me, which was cool of him. Congrats to Sean, and to Microsoft. Good start!

So, here you go - Our interview with Sean from a few months ago:

RunAs Radio #53: Sean Siler Sets Us Straight on IPv6! (download MP3)

And here are the three new commercials. Personally, I like 'em.




Oh and if you send an email to Sean's address as listed in the three videos, you'll get a reply. I'd post it here, but it'll be more fun if you do it yourself. :)



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Geek Out | RunAs Radio | Tech
Thursday, September 18, 2008 9:05:13 PM (Pacific Standard Time, UTC-08:00)
#  
 Tuesday, September 16, 2008

The latest version of SQL Server implements several object models through Powershell to let folks manage SQL Server without using the SQL management tools.

We've just published a new episode of the RunAs Radio podcast with Michiel Wories, in which we dive into SQL Server 2008's Powershell features. Michiel is certainly the one to know and share about these features: He joined Microsoft 7 1/2 years ago in the role of Senior Program Manager for Microsoft SQL Server and is currently working as a Principal Architect on defining the next generation SQL Server management platform infrastructure. Michiel's blog is at http://blogs.msdn.com/mwories/

RunAs Radio is a weekly Internet-audio talk show for IT Professionals presented in a high-quality podcast format. Since April 2007 RunAs Radio has brought experts in the field of IT to its 10,000+ listeners, to inform and entertain. Professionally produced interviews are about 30 minutes in length and pack a substantial amount of information for maximum benefit. For more information about RunAs Radio, visit http://www.runasradio.com. RunAs Radio is available on iTunes and the Zune Marketplace, as well as directly from the RunAs Radio web site.



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RunAs Radio | Tech
Tuesday, September 16, 2008 9:01:17 PM (Pacific Standard Time, UTC-08:00)
#  
 Wednesday, September 03, 2008
As is the case with more and more technology in the modern age, it's when you start to combine the power of two or more technologies that you realize the full potential of each. Such is the case with Microsoft's Unified Communications products. Sure, Exchange and Office Communication Server are both great on their own, but when you use them together (and potentially integrate with your VoIP phone system), you realize the greater value of your investments.

Jeff Goodwin works at The VIA Group, where he specializes in Microsoft Exchange and Microsoft Unified Communications in his position as Senior Technologist and Microsoft Practice Lead. He's executed a large number of UC projects for businesses, so we were fortunate to have the opportunity to speak with Jeff recently on RunAs Radio. He does a fine job of explaining what unified communications is all about.
Jeff Goodwin Rings Us Into Unified Communications
RunAs Radio Show #73 - 9/3/2008 (35 minutes)


Richard and I talked to Jeff Goodwin about Microsoft Unified Communications in this week's RunAs Radio show. Jeff lays out the relationship between Exchange, Office Communicator and Unified Messaging Server to combine email, telephone and instant messaging. Check out Jeff's TechNet articles at http://www.shrinkster.com/11mj and http://www.shrinkster.com/11mk.

RunAs Radio is a weekly Internet-audio talk show for IT Professionals presented in a high-quality podcast format. Since April 2007 RunAs Radio has brought experts in the field of IT to its 10,000+ listeners, to inform and entertain. Professionally produced interviews are about 30 minutes in length and pack a substantial amount of information for maximum benefit. For more information about RunAs Radio, visit http://www.runasradio.com. RunAs Radio is available on iTunes and the Zune Marketplace, as well as directly from the RunAs Radio web site.



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RunAs Radio | Tech
Wednesday, September 03, 2008 4:32:36 PM (Pacific Standard Time, UTC-08:00)
#  
 Sunday, July 27, 2008

Last week we published an interview that Richard and I did on RunAs Radio with my friend and former co-worker, Simon Goldstein. Simon's a real pro and is good at explaining complicated business relationships and processes.

We cover risk management for IT professionals: What is it, what do you need to know, and why does it matter? As with all of our weekly RunAs Radio shows, it's about 30 minutes long and we cover a lot of ground in that time.

RunAs Radio, Show 67 - Simon Goldstein on IT Risk Management (38 minutes)

Note: You can find all our podcast feeds in the table here, and you can also subscribe to get the show every week in iTunes by clicking here.



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IT Security | RunAs Radio | Tech
Sunday, July 27, 2008 7:39:34 PM (Pacific Standard Time, UTC-08:00)
#  
 Wednesday, May 21, 2008
Susan Bradley is often referred to by her compadres as the "SBS Diva," and for good reason. Richard and I had the opportunity to talk about Small Business Server with her recently for an episode of RunAs Radio (our weekly IT podcast talk show). We talked about what SBS is, where it cames from, and also about SBS 2008. It always surprises me how afordable and complete SBS is.

If you run or operate (or do IT for) a small to medium sized business, I think checking out SBS via this interview will be 30 minutes well-spent.

Show #57: Susan Bradley Fills Us In On Small Business Server



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RunAs Radio | Tech
Wednesday, May 21, 2008 6:35:09 AM (Pacific Standard Time, UTC-08:00)
#  
 Friday, April 18, 2008
IPv6 has been around for something on the order of 15 years, yet it has yet to see widespread adoption. It was recently enabled on Internet core DNS infrastructure, and had been adopted in some network like those operated by certain mobile carriers. The current IP addressing and allocation scheme, dubbed IPv4, will eventually run out of IP addresses. There's been a sort of boy-called-wolf debate over whether we're really going to allocate the entire IPv4 address space anytime soon or not. But eventually we'll run out - some say in 2010.

Sean Siler, Program Manager responsible for IPv6, joined Richard Campbell and me for a RunAs Radio show. Sean really knows his stuff and did a terrific job of describing IPv6, comparing it to IPv4, and other useful information.

IPv6 enables a lot more than just additional addresses, though. Sean discusses what's the same, what's different and what's new (hint: IPSEC and multicasting everywhere). He also offers a great analogy to describe the enormous size of the IPv6 address space. It's mind-boggling, really.

If you don't understand or know much about IPv6, this interview is a great place to start learning, and you truly need to be doing so if you do network design or other work in your job. The change is significant, but not impossible - so go listen to the show and get learning!

Other resources:



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IT Security | RunAs Radio | Tech
Friday, April 18, 2008 10:06:20 AM (Pacific Standard Time, UTC-08:00)
#  
 Sunday, April 13, 2008

Richard Campbell and I sat down and discussed virtualization with Anil Desai. Released in beta with Windows Server 2008 and soon to be released in it's final form, Hyper-V is an interesting and worthwhile technology that leverages 64-bit computing and allows you to run different virtual OS'es on the server with full symmetrical multiprocessor support. Virtualization is a primary role of Windows Server 2008. The release candidate of Hyper-V is available now.

You can download and listen the MP3 version of our interview with Anil by clicking here, or click over to the RunAs Radio site for more formats (like WMA, AAC), which is where our weekly IT audio talk show "lives."

For more information from Microsoft about Hyper-V, check these links:



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RunAs Radio | Tech
Sunday, April 13, 2008 12:23:57 PM (Pacific Standard Time, UTC-08:00)
#  
 Thursday, March 20, 2008

We recently conducted an interview with Michael Manos, Senior Director of Data Center Services at Microsoft, on RunAs Radio. Microsoft's been working on a substantial set of data center build-outs, and so Richard and I figured there's a lot we can all learn from someone like Michael. Not many people have to think as carefully or in such a large scale about how to best tackle the data center design and build issues.

Microsoft has been doubling their data center capacity each year, and they have to think about maximizing efficiencies, "greening" the data center, locations, power - you name it.

If you're in any way associated with data center design, architecture or operations this show's for you.



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RunAs Radio | Tech
Thursday, March 20, 2008 2:06:13 PM (Pacific Standard Time, UTC-08:00)
#  
 Thursday, March 13, 2008

When I record my audio for the RunAs Radio show, I'm typically sitting in my home office at my desk and using Audacity along with my Samson 01U USB microphone plugged into my Vista laptop. Audacity is an open-source program for all sorts of fancy audio recording, processing and editing. It's really pretty amazing.

Until fairly recently, Audacity was also pretty reliable. But about a month ago I started experiencing occasional crashes when trying to save and export the audio from my recording sessions. Now, if you think about for more than a couple seconds you'll quickly understand that crashes that occur after the interview is over, but before the file is saved, are extremely frustrating - and not just for me. A recording session do-over with three or more people involved in a 30- to 45-minute interview is really not a nice thing to have to ask for.

This morning Richard and I completed an interview with a guest. When I went to save the file, Audacity crashed. My heart sank, and my brain went into oh-crap-overdrive mode. I really did not want to be in the position of having to ask a busy guest to schedule more time to record an interview that had been quite good in the original session. I needed some magic.

I started thinking about temp files. The hard drive is always flashing away as I record the interviews, so something must be saved somewhere, right?

Sure enough, a quick search for *.au files on the hard drive uncovered nearly 400 files in a "_data" folder off the Audacity project's location. The date and time stamps on them made me feel a lot better - Phew! Each file appeared to contain 10 seconds of audio. The first one was stamped with the exact time we started recording the interview, and the last one with the time we stopped.

I imported all the .au files into Audacity, thinking I could just do that and I'd be good to go. But it turns out Audacity doesn't import files one-after-the-other on the timeline. Instead, it imports them as if they were almost 400 individual tracks in a single 10-second audio project. I started the click-cut-end-paste process, and quickly realized it was going to take literally hours to fix this problem manually.

(Also, just for fun I decided to see if the program would actually play a 10-second project session with 400 tracks in it. No dice.)

I quickly gave up on the cut-paste option in search of something better. What I found was the aptly-named Audacity Recovery Utility. Apparently I'm not the only one who's needed to recover recorded audio seemingly lost during application crashes. It's a Python app and can be used on Windows, Mac and Linux.

The program is simple in its execution. You point it at a folder and it looks for audio files, tries to determine if they are all one block/set, or if they're more than one, and then attempts to put them together into a single .WAV file that you can then import back into Audacity (or anywhere else for that matter) for editing and processing.

image

The app will confirm what it finds and give you a chance to stop it from proceeding.

image

Tell it "Yes" and the program starts processing the temp files.

image

Out the other end, you'll eventually get a .WAV file that you can use.

Sure saved my backside today. Thanks to the author! By the way, supposedly Audacity 1.3.2 and newer (which is a beta release right now, not the stable version) have crash recovery built in. I'll probably have to check that out, as well.



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AudioBlogging | RunAs Radio | Tech
Thursday, March 13, 2008 1:43:13 PM (Pacific Standard Time, UTC-08:00)
#  
 Tuesday, February 12, 2008

Richard and I had a good conversation with Scott Kveton, OpenID personality extraordinaire, on the RunAs Radio podcast this week. Scott is chairman of the OpenID Foundation.

OpenID is a cool and upcoming technology and has seen significant attention in the past few weeks especially as Yahoo! became an OpenID provider, immediately followed by an announcement that Microsoft, Google, Yahoo!, IBM and Verisign had joined the board of the OpenID Foundation.

It's time to get on-board and know what OpenID is, how it might play with other technologies in the identity and access management space, and how you can learn more. That's what this show is all about.

Scott Kveton Shares His OpenID (MP3 link)
from the RunAs Radio podcast

Richard and Greg talk to Scott Kveton about OpenID. OpenID is a single sign-on solution that could very well make the classic username and password obsolete. This is a fast half hour - you'll find yourself wanting to listen again!



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IT Security | RunAs Radio | Tech
Tuesday, February 12, 2008 9:25:19 PM (Pacific Standard Time, UTC-08:00)
#  
 Wednesday, February 06, 2008

Richard and I spent about 30 minutes the other day chatting with Bil Simser, all-around good guy and MS SharePoint MVP since 2004. SharePoint is a set of technologies I have been involved with since before day one, if that's even possible. I remember vividly deploying SharePoint Portal Server 2001 as a secure extranet site (something it really wasn't intended to do) before it was even released. SharePoint's come a long, long way since then for sure!

It's common for IT professionals to have SharePoint shoved into their laps unsuspectingly by users or prospective users as a platform for business intelligence or document management or collaboration, so it's a good idea to be aware, try it out, see what you can do with it (and what you can't), and what it takes to properly design, build, deploy and manage in the environment.

Listen to the show for analogies, buzz words, licensing, planning, components and other important things to think about when you find yourself in the world of SharePoint.

Bil Simser On Managing Sharepoint (MP3 link)
from RunAs Radio podcast

Richard and Greg talk to Bil Simser about the challenges of managing Sharepoint 2007. Bil points us to the SharePoint Capacity Tool (www.shrinkster.com/uhw) and comparisons between Windows SharePoint Services and Microsoft Office SharePoint Server (www.shrinkster.com/ui1). Check out Bil's blog at www.shrinkster.com/uhv.



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RunAs Radio | SharePoint | Tech
Wednesday, February 06, 2008 4:33:21 PM (Pacific Standard Time, UTC-08:00)
#  
 Sunday, October 28, 2007

November will be a busy month of conference travel for me. On November 7th I'll fly briefly to Las Vegas for a quick panel gig at the DevConnections conference (I'll be there Wednesday afternoon and all day Thursday), followed by a more extensive trip on Saturday the 10th to Barcelona, Spain. I'll be there for the entire IT Forum week of Microsoft's TechEd Europe conference. I've never been to Spain before, so I'm looking forward to the trip.

If you'll be at either of the shows, let me know and hopefully we can meet up and say hi. I'll be there in part to help run some floor events and to record more interesting interviews for our RunAs Radio shows.

I'm also going to stop off in the SF bay area on my way back from Spain to spend Thanksgiving with my dad and family there. By the time I get home it will have been two weeks on the road.



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RunAs Radio | Tech
Sunday, October 28, 2007 10:33:15 AM (Pacific Standard Time, UTC-08:00)
#  
 Tuesday, September 25, 2007

We had an opportunity recently to speak with Trey Johnson, Chief Business Intelligence Architect at Cizer, about the current state of BI in the industry and some of the new technologies available on the Microsoft side of things. We also touched on what business intelligence means these days and some of the things IT professionals need to be thinking about when contemplating a BI project.

RunAs Radio Show #25 - 9/26/2007 (31 minutes)
Trey Johnson Helps Us Get Business Intelligence

Richard and Greg talk to Trey Johnson from Cizer about Microsoft's Business Intelligence offerings. The product line up from Microsoft is expanding beyond SQL Server, Analysis Services and Excel to include Microsoft Office Sharepoint Services, the new PerformancePoint Server and ProClarity Analysis Tools.

One thing's for sure: If you don't have your ducks truly in a row before you start, a poorly-planned BI project can be a money pit of enormous size. But it's not all that complicated to do it well. It just takes a careful approach, the proper people and a set of well-defined and complete requirements. Trey helps us get a handle on the current state of affairs.



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RunAs Radio | Tech
Tuesday, September 25, 2007 9:25:20 PM (Pacific Standard Time, UTC-08:00)
#  

It's always difficult to know exactly what it takes to become a better (insert technical role here). So it goes with being a great DBA. Similarly, I can remember way back in my "webmaster" days when I was trying to figure out how to grow in that role, and discovering that the term "webmaster" always seemed to mean something different to each company or organization I spoke with.

That seems to be a perennial problem. Someone defines a general title without having a real solid idea of what the role is. Or, as in the case of the DBA, the job becomes more complex and critical over time, and so needs change and the role becomes more complex. Certainly that happened with the "webmaster role" of the past. Today we have UI experts, back-end programmers, middle-tier developers, content administrators, etc. Times change.

Brad McGehee is a great person to ask about the DBA market: How do you become a DBA? Where do you start? What's the future look like? What exactly is a DBA, anyhow? Well, we interviewed Brad recently for an episode of RunAs Radio and his insights into this world were quite useful.

RunAs Radio - Show #24 | 9/19/2007 (41 minutes)
Brad McGehee On Being a Better DBA

Brad McGehee discusses the career path of a professional database administrator. Often the DBA role is thrust upon an IT professional or developer without much in the way of specific training. Growing into the role is largely a self-motivated exercise. Brad talks about the habits that successful DBAs have, focused on on-going education and working to protect their organizations data.

Side Note: We've recorded more than 25 shows now since we started the RunAs Radio show in April. You can subscribe in iTunes at this link. It's seen more downloads and attention than I could have possibly imagined, and we have much, much more to come. We'll also be at TechEd Europe in Barcelona, Spain this fall and involved in a variety of other upcoming events.



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RunAs Radio | Tech
Tuesday, September 25, 2007 8:47:49 AM (Pacific Standard Time, UTC-08:00)
#  
 Thursday, June 28, 2007

Identity and Access Management (often referred to by identity geeks as IAM) is a field I have come to know and love. There's been a resurgence in the past few years in this space, brought on by a number of builders of critical mass. One of those drivers, in the financial services industry, was some "guidance" issued by the FFIEC (United States federal government agency that regulates banks) in 2005 that requires banks to use stronger authentication for online banking services (better than just user name and password). In addition, the general discomfort across all industries that use the Internet as a true platform for doing business has become a motivator, especially in the wake of multiple news cycles about fraud and data theft. In a nutshell, The Internet is a technology platform that is being used for something it was not originally architected to do, and as a result there are some critical gaps from a technology perspective - especially in the area of security. Many defensive "point" solutions have been cobbled together over the years to plug holes in the metaphorical levee, but at some point you have to start thinking about either building some serious reinforcements or - quite possibly - building a whole new dam to serve the needs.

Over the past couple years the open source community, Microsoft, and a number of other companies large and small have embarked on a bit of a shared crusade (and a good one, at that) to first redefine and then re-architect identity on the Internet, how it works and what the principles are that guide and drive Identity going forward. It's been a rare and refreshing community effort, and as a result we are starting to see some real-world traction in markets like financial services; Interest is growing outside the circle of academics and programmers that are implementing the new systems. Interoperability is being seen as critical and that's likely the one things that will drive success. And while we can design a great system that can solve all the world's ills, adoption is the second-to-final gauge of success in this case (longevity and strength are the final-final determining factor, but we can't truly get there without meaningful and across-the-industry adoption).

One of the architects of this whole concept in redefining and improving Identity on the Internet is Kim Cameron. He writes the Identity Blog (worth a subscription if you're not already there) and was the publishing author of his "Laws of Identity," or what he refers to as "the missing layer of the Internet." I had the good fortune to play host to Kim and his compadre, Rich Turner (both work for Microsoft) when they spoke at a security conference I hosted a couple months ago. They discussed identity in general as well as CardSpace, Microsoft's effort in the larger community effort to add this missing layer to the Internet schema.

Richard Turner is the Product Manager for Microsoft's Identity Platform Developer Marketing group and owns Windows CardSpace Product Management there. While at the Microsoft TechEd conference in Orlando a few weeks back, I found him and pulled him aside for about 45 minutes to chat with Richard Campbell and me for the RunAs radio show we do each week. You can hear the interview here:

RunAs Radio Show #12 | 6/27/2007 (47 minutes)
Richard Turner Checks Our Identity

Another Tech Ed US 2007 interview from Orlando, Richard and Greg sit down with Richard Turner and discuss how CardSpace impacts the IT professional. CardSpace (formerly code-named "InfoCard") is a key technology in Microsoft's Identity Platform.

Links: RunAs Radio web site and RSS feed

As always, we welcome your input and ideas for the show - Just email info@runasradio.com and let us know what's on your mind! We might even read your email on the air, and we are always interested to know what you would like to hear more about as we book our guests.



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IT Security | RunAs Radio | Tech
Thursday, June 28, 2007 7:47:08 AM (Pacific Standard Time, UTC-08:00)
#  
 Monday, June 25, 2007

In my line of work, we spend a lot of our time writing software that catches bad guys and keeps them out of systems that require protection. So, in the course of building good security and forensics software I often work closely with partner companies that bring something valuable to the table - technology that we might include or integrate with but would not build ourselves. One of the technology areas that adds value to what we do is the business of Internet Protocol (IP) address intelligence and geolocation. The ability to glean a variety of valuable information about any given IP address or block provides the opportunity for both intelligent and - if the partner does their job well - reliable decision making, in a manner not otherwise possible. Imagine your application being able to present information or make decisions based on the actual physical location of a user, or base don the type of connection they are making. In the case of the software I've been involved with creating, IP intelligence is a key capability that helps to enhance the products.

So, for last week's RunAs Radio interview, we sat down with an expert in the field, Bill Varga, who works for a company out of Mountain View, California called Quova - one of the partners I have worked with for a few years now. They do IP geolocation and IP intelligence - and that's their business. They're focused on that market and they're very good at it. IP intelligence is a world that is growing quickly and always generates ideas and thought when brought up for discussion. The applications of IP-related metadata are many, and Bill effectively describes them in our interview. He also discusses some of the new things Quova is doing in the field.

RunAs Radio Show #11 | 6/20/2007 (38 minutes)
Bill Varga Makes Us IP Intelligent

Richard and Greg talk to Bill Varga about what IP (that's Internet Protocol) Intelligence is all about. They also dig into how IP geolocation helps with regulatory compliance and fraud detection. Bill also talks about the new technology Quova (his employer) has developed that can deal with geolocation of satellite and megaproxy IP addresses.

Links: RunAs Radio web site and RSS feed

We welcome your input and ideas for the show - Just email info@runasradio.com and let us know what's on your mind! We might even read your email on the air, and we are always interested to know what you would like to hear about as we book our guests.



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IT Security | RunAs Radio | Tech
Monday, June 25, 2007 7:37:43 AM (Pacific Standard Time, UTC-08:00)
#  
 Thursday, June 14, 2007

RunAs Radio Show Number Ten is now online. While at Tech Ed US 2007 in Orlando last week, we sat down to chat with Isaac Roybal for the RunAs audio podcast, a Microsoft Product Manager on the Windows Server team working on the next version of Internet Information Services - IIS7.

Put simply, IIS7 includes a large number of significant improvements and enhancements for both developers and for the IT pros and hosting providers that have to implement, support, secure and maintain the servers. Tons of great information and interaction around IIS7 is available at the new community web site, IIS.NET. Many of the improvements and changes to IIS are listed on that site, as well. You can download Windows Server Beta 3 and go live with IIS7 now, and Microsoft has a program for doing so. If nothing else, you should be starting your lab work so you can plan, get familiar and see what the future of IIS holds.

RunAs Radio Show #10 | 6/13/2007 (41 minutes)
Isaac Roybal Shows Us IIS7

Isaac Roybal is a Product Manager on the Windows Server team who is deeply involved in Web Workload, especially IIS 7. Isaac digs into the details of the new management features in IIS 7, now available as part of Windows Server 2008 Beta 3. His responsibilities cover all things Web related with Windows Server and has been involved with IT for over ten years. Five of those years have been with Microsoft.

Links: RunAs Radio web site and RSS feed

We welcome your input and ideas for the show - Just email info@runasradio.com and let us know what's on your mind! We might even read your email on the air, and we are always interested to know what you would like to hear about as we book our guests.



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IT Security | RunAs Radio | Tech
Thursday, June 14, 2007 8:23:18 AM (Pacific Standard Time, UTC-08:00)
#  
 Wednesday, June 06, 2007

Catching up on announcing a few new RunAs RunAs Radio shows that I've neglected to mention here over the past couple weeks. We publish a new episode each and every Wednesday. The show has been live since mid-April and it's been pleasantly surprising to see how quickly it's taken off!

Anyhow - RunAs Radio Shows 7, 8 and 9 are now online. Discussions in these shows include disk and file encryption and the TrueCrypt open source software, Public Key Infrastructure (PKI) and what it means to you as an IT professional, and Microsoft Operations Manager (MOM) 2007, a great tool for managing and monitoring your enterprise, whether small or large.

Links: RunAs Radio web site and RSS feed

We always welcome your input and ideas for the show - Just email info@runasradio.com and let us know what's on your mind! We might even read (and answer) your email "on the air," and we are always interested to know what you would like to hear about as we book our guests.



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IT Security | RunAs Radio | Tech
Wednesday, June 06, 2007 1:15:17 PM (Pacific Standard Time, UTC-08:00)
#  
 Sunday, May 20, 2007

RunAs Radio Show Number Six is now online. I'm a few days late in posting this, but Wes Miller (who worked in the past at Winternals and Microsoft) sat down with Richard and me to talk about the future, benefits and issues around 64-bit Windows in the Server and Vista flavors.

RunAs Radio Show #6 | 5/16/2007 (34 minutes)
Wes Miller on our 64-bit Future

In late 2004, Wes left Microsoft to work for Winternals Software (which was then acquired by Microsoft in 2006), in Austin, Texas, where he currently resides. Wes currently works at Pluck (http://www.pluck.com) in Austin as a Development Manager. His area of Windows focus is generally enterprise deployment, lifecycle management and security.

Links: RunAs Radio web site and RSS feed

We welcome your input and ideas - Just email info@runasradio.com and let us know what's on your mind! We might even read your email on the air, and we are always interested to know what you would like to hear about as we book our guests.



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AudioBlogging | RunAs Radio | Tech
Sunday, May 20, 2007 9:27:13 AM (Pacific Standard Time, UTC-08:00)
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 Friday, May 11, 2007

RunAs Radio Show Number Five is now online. Richard and I speak with John Savill about application virtualization. This is not the same things as server virtualization (or virtual machines), but instead is about virtualized instances of software apps. For organizations that are distributed (more and more of us as time goes on), app virtualization is a cool things to look into. John does a great job of explaining app virtualization and gives some examples of how it works and can be leveraged.

RunAs Radio Show #5 | 5/9/2007 (36 minutes)
John Savill on Application Virtualization

John Savill is Director of Technical Infrastructure for Geniant. He is a CISSP, a Security and Messaging MCSE on Windows Server 2003, an eight-time MVP, and a Krav Maga instructor. He is also the author of Windows Server 2003 Active Directory Design and Implementation from Packt Publishing. 

Links: RunAs Radio web site and RSS feed

We welcome your input and ideas - Just email info@runasradio.com and let us know what's on your mind! We might even read your email on the air, and we are always interested to know what you would like to hear about as we book our guests.



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AudioBlogging | RunAs Radio | Tech
Friday, May 11, 2007 7:20:51 AM (Pacific Standard Time, UTC-08:00)
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 Wednesday, May 02, 2007

RunAs Radio Show Number Four is now online. Richard and I speak with Simon Goldstein, who (it just so happens) works with me and is a good friend. Simon has a depth of knowledge and expertise that sets him apart in the areas of risk management, compliance and a variety of other topics. In this interview we discussed the compliance and security world and how it applies to practical IT. Simon distills a lot of broad topics down into the nuts and bolts, so pretty much anyone can understand how compliance works and why it's important:

RunAs Radio Show #4 | 5/2/2007 (44 minutes)
Simon Goldstein on Compliance

Simon Goldstein talks to Richard and Greg about making sense out of compliance with rules and regulations around Information Technology.

Links: RunAs Radio web site and RSS feed

We welcome your input and ideas - Just email info@runasradio.com and let us know what's on your mind! We  are always looking to know what you would like to hear about as we book our guests.



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IT Security | Management | RunAs Radio | Tech
Wednesday, May 02, 2007 7:00:27 AM (Pacific Standard Time, UTC-08:00)
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 Wednesday, April 25, 2007

So, Carl let us know this morning that in the first two weeks of RunAs Radio, there have been 13,588 downloads - a figure that pleasantly surprised me - Pretty exciting!

And we're keeping at it: RusAs Radio Show Number Three is now online. Richard and I spoke with Dana Epp of Scorpion Software about CardSpace and the future of access management and authentication:

RunAs Radio Show #3 | 4/22/2007 (35 minutes)
Dana Epp talks CardSpace on the Client-Side

Richard and Greg speak to Microsoft Security MVP Dana Epp about Microsoft's CardSpace initiative for secure authentication. They hint at another show focusing on the server side.

Links: RunAs Radio web site and RSS feed

We welcome your input and ideas - Just email info@runasradio.com and let us know what's on your mind! We have a couple good shows coming up in the next weeks, and are always wanting to know what you would like to hear about as we book our guests.



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AudioBlogging | IT Security | RunAs Radio | Tech
Wednesday, April 25, 2007 8:07:21 PM (Pacific Standard Time, UTC-08:00)
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 Thursday, April 19, 2007

RusAs Radio Show Number Two is online, and Richard and I spoke with David Sengupta about Exchange old and new as well as a variety of issues and topics around messaging and collaboration:

Show #2 | 4/18/2007 (32 minutes)
David Sengupta on Exchange Email Policy Issues

Exchange MVP David Sengupta discusses issues and best practices around email policy and related strategies.

Links: RunAs Radio web site and RSS feed

We welcome your input and ideas - Just email info@runasradio.com and let us know what's on your mind!



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RunAs Radio | Tech
Thursday, April 19, 2007 8:28:30 AM (Pacific Standard Time, UTC-08:00)
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 Monday, April 16, 2007

I've listened to several recordings of myself over the past couple weeks, thanks to the fact that we've recently started producing RunAs Radio, a weekly tech podcast. As I mentioned on the launch date, I am co-host with Richard Campbell. It's fun so far. We have a couple more shows "in the can" that will run very soon where we'll speak with smart and knowledgeable people about technology topics that matter.

I have found - as do most people, I think - that I really dislike hearing my own recorded voice. Honestly, it drives me nuts. Both metaphorically and physically speaking, nothing sounds the same inside our own heads as it does to the outside world. So when we hear a recording of our own voices, we tend to cringe - especially when we realize that's what we really sound like.

But the interviewing is fun, and Richard is a great guy to work with, so I have been enjoying the process. Some people tell me they're wondering what equipment I ended up with for the project. I bought a few things last week to set myself up (I had been borrowing Scott Hanselman's stuff for the first show and some testing). So, here goes:

The microphone is a Samson C01U USB studio condenser mic, which plugs straight into the computer's USB port and is recognized by Windows without any additional drivers. There is some fancy software available for Windows XP that can be used to pre-mix and some other fancy stuff, but for my use on Vista, I just plugged in and went. And it works great. For about $80 you can't really beat the quality. It's a solid, good sounding mic.

The mic is suspended in an audio-technica AT8415 anti-shock mount, which is one of those nifty rings with a bunch of rubber bands that keeps the noise from bumps, vibrations and other environmental noise away from the microphone. It can make a huge difference. I scooped up the anti-shock mount for $19 at a local store - it was in a box barely used without a price, and they were happy to sell it. New they sell for much more.

The desk stand is a short, basic Atlas Sound model that sells for under $20 and stands about ten inches tall when it's collapsed. It has a heavy padded base.

Finally, I bought a pop filter, which for all intents and purposes is just a fancy ring with nylon material (a lot like pantyhose) stretched across it, plus an articulating gooseneck mount that you can clamp to the mic stand. You just position it between your mouth and the mic.  The pop filter helps to ensure your P's and T's and what-not don't result in loud popping sounds to the mic - It keeps the harshness and resulting rush of wind from those types of syllables to a minimum. I didn't buy the most expensive model, and we'll just have to see whether or not I should have.

The way we record the show is a little different than most podcasters probably used to. RunAs Radio, like other shows done by Pwop Productions, is a fully-produced show, meaning a human being actually goes through the recording tracks, lines them up, cleans them all up and produces the final cut of the show. Quality of the sound is important to the producers. For my part, my voice is actually recorded twice during the interviews: Once by Richard over the phone on a system he has set up there, and a second time locally and in a high-quality mode on my computer using the mic setup described above and some special audio recording software from Pwop. The Pwopcaster software lets me set the mic levels, test, record and then upload the audio files to the Pwop studio, and they take it from there. My uploaded voice track is synched up with the phone track of my voice from Richard's multi-track recording, the audio is cleaned up for noise and edited for sneezes and such, and there you have it - RunAs Radio.

Of course, it's not really that simple - post-production is the hard part. The fact of the matter is that the main thing that makes it possible for me to participate in this show on my schedule is the fact that I only have to do the easy part: Chatting with smart people about interesting tech topics. I've turned down several requests and opportunities to participate in podcasts in the past simply because I did not have the time to do it all by myself and do it well. With this opportunity as long as I suit up and show up, we're good to go. And that's something I can work to make time for.

Stay tuned for more editions of RunAs Radio - coming very soon!



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AudioBlogging | RunAs Radio | Tech
Monday, April 16, 2007 2:02:50 PM (Pacific Standard Time, UTC-08:00)
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 Tuesday, April 10, 2007

What better way to spend your "I am officially old" day than doing something completely new? As of today, a new podcast called RunAs Radio, hosted by Richard Campbell and co-hosted by Yours Truly, is being launched. Richard writes in a bit more detail about it on his weblog.

It's a weekly IT podcast with a Microsoft technologies focus. Richard and I will discuss all sorts of relevant topics with a variety of smart and interesting people. I am excited and looking forward to being a part of this project.

RunAs Radio was launched on April 11, 2007 with a nod from its sister show, .NET Rocks!, which started as a weekly downloadable mp3 in August, 2002! Coincidentally, the first RunAs Radio show features Patrick Hynds, who was also the first guest on .NET Rocks!

I have acquired a nice new mic and accessories to make some high quality recordings (but I will save the details for another post).

We hope you enjoy the show, and of course you should let us know what you think. The show is professionally produced by the great people at Pwop Productions.

Show #1 | 4/11/2007 (46 minutes)
Pat Hynds on Storage Technology

Patrick Hynds from Critical Sites kicks off this all-new Microsoft-centric IT podcast with a discussion about storage. This show is atypically long. We're trying for 30 minutes per show.

Links: RunAs Radio web site and RSS feed



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AudioBlogging | Tech | RunAs Radio
Tuesday, April 10, 2007 10:56:05 PM (Pacific Standard Time, UTC-08:00)
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